[Callers] Ricochet hey dances

Martha Wild mawild at sbcglobal.net
Thu Dec 9 21:26:25 PST 2010


I have a couple that you are welcome to call. Chris Page has written  
a nice one that perhaps he would share, too. Oh, and I don't know why  
when I paste from Word I get double spacing or how to fix it, so sorry!

King Bee Hey

Martha Wild

Duple improper         February 21, 2004



A1         Do-si-do neighbor

          Allemande right neighbor 1 ½

A2       Ricochet hey (men pass left shoulder, women push off)*

B1         Men pass left one more time, swing partner

B2         Men allemande left 1 ½

          Women join in behind partner for a left hands across star 1X


*The men dance the full hey, passing left shoulders in the middle.


^ On the men allemande left, the women have to let the men get around  
once and then as their partner passes they move in behind him to join  
the left hand star. A bit of a moving start on the part of the women  
helps.


The first ricochet hey I ever did was a dance called "Huntsville's  
Queen Bee Hey". The women do the hey, the men ricochet. So I called  
this one a King Bee Hey.

Then I decided to do a few "Worker Bee" heys:

Worker Bee Hey #1

Martha Wild

Duple improper         September 24, 2006



A1         Down the set four in line (1s inside)

          Turn as neighbor couples and return*, face center of the line^

A2         “Worker bee” hey@, 2s start passing right shoulder

B1         2s gypsy and swing, end swing facing up!

B2         Handy-hand allemande ~1 ½ times (2s step inside)

          1s swing and face down



* A little odd as the men are on the right of the women for the turn.

^ The line is not bent, all just turn to face center, 2s facing each  
other, 1s behind.

@ I thought it would be nice to do the push off of a “queen bee” hey  
with one’s own partner. In this case, the #2 couple does a full hey,  
passing right shoulders to start, while the #1 couple meets at the  
center and pushes off backwards in little counterclockwise circles.  
If the 1's adjust a little for the 2's while they swing so they are  
ready for the handy-hand allemande, this works well.



Worker Bee Hey #2

Martha Wild

Duple Improper         September 24, 2006



A1         Do-si-do neighbor

          Swing neighbor

A2         Four in line down the set

          Turn as couples, come back up

B1         Face in, “Worker Bee” hey, 1s start^

B2         1s gypsy and swing



^ Worker bee hey is as described above.



I like version 1 because both 1s and 2s get a partner swing. This is  
an easier version, but unequal.



On Dec 8, 2010, at 9:00 AM, callers-request at sharedweight.net wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Teaching a Ricochet Hey (John Sweeney)
>    2. Re: Teaching a Ricochet Hey (Ron Nelson)
>    3. Re: ricochet or push-back hey - Tapsalteerie (Lisa Greenleaf)
>    4. Re: Teaching a Ricochet Hey (Martha Edwards)
>    5. Re: Teaching a Ricochet Hey (Andrea Nettleton)
>    6. Re: Ricochet Hey (John Sweeney)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 17:43:13 -0000
> From: "John Sweeney" <info at contrafusion.co.uk>
> To: <callers at sharedweight.net>
> Subject: [Callers] Teaching a Ricochet Hey
> Message-ID: <CA0CE9090DD943DB981F833BFF1A9940 at JohnT400>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> The key thing for the caller to understand is that when the two  
> dancers
> ricochet they take each other's place in the hey, and are now going
> backwards.
>
> This means that they must NOT just bounce back the way they came,  
> or to
> a neutral position on their own side - they have to follow the looping
> flow of the hey.
>
> I never actually explain that though.  I just tell them to bounce back
> at the opposite angle to the way they came in.  Describing it as a
> triangle usually helps. And one quick demo usually solves 90% of the
> problems.
>
> The other 10% of the problems come from people who bounce back and  
> then
> stop!  They are still part of the hey and have to keep moving.
>
> So instructions like these sometimes work: "As you come to the middle
> you will meet someone on a diagonal; bounce off that person and head
> backwards on the other diagonal, then move left* and come in again;  
> you
> are going around the same triangle over and over again."
>
> *or right, depends on the dance.
>
> Note: As you bounce you change direction by just under 90 degrees,  
> it is
> very easy to let that rotation continue and throw a couple of spins in
> :-)
>
>             Happy dancing,
>                         John
>
> John Sweeney, Dancer, England   john at modernjive.com 01233 625 362 &
> 07802 940 574
> http://www.modernjive.com for Modern Jive Events, Instructional  
> DVDs and
> Interactive Maps
> http://www.contrafusion.co.uk for Contra Dancing in Kent
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 17:57:38 +0000
> From: Ron Nelson <callerman at hotmail.com>
> To: <callers at sharedweight.net>
> Subject: Re: [Callers] Teaching a Ricochet Hey
> Message-ID: <BAY158-W162F5D0B4F05A84D3CAA57B82C0 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>
> Very perceptive description John. It helped me considerably as I  
> prepare to teach this movement.
>
> Thanks,
> Ron Nelson
>
>> From: info at contrafusion.co.uk
>> To: callers at sharedweight.net
>> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 17:43:13 +0000
>> Subject: [Callers] Teaching a Ricochet Hey
>>
>> The key thing for the caller to understand is that when the two  
>> dancers
>> ricochet they take each other's place in the hey, and are now going
>> backwards.
>>
>> This means that they must NOT just bounce back the way they came,  
>> or to
>> a neutral position on their own side - they have to follow the  
>> looping
>> flow of the hey.
>>
>> I never actually explain that though. I just tell them to bounce back
>> at the opposite angle to the way they came in. Describing it as a
>> triangle usually helps. And one quick demo usually solves 90% of the
>> problems.
>>
>> The other 10% of the problems come from people who bounce back and  
>> then
>> stop! They are still part of the hey and have to keep moving.
>>
>> So instructions like these sometimes work: "As you come to the middle
>> you will meet someone on a diagonal; bounce off that person and head
>> backwards on the other diagonal, then move left* and come in  
>> again; you
>> are going around the same triangle over and over again."
>>
>> *or right, depends on the dance.
>>
>> Note: As you bounce you change direction by just under 90 degrees,  
>> it is
>> very easy to let that rotation continue and throw a couple of  
>> spins in
>> :-)
>>
>> Happy dancing,
>> John
>>
>> John Sweeney, Dancer, England john at modernjive.com 01233 625 362 &
>> 07802 940 574
>> http://www.modernjive.com for Modern Jive Events, Instructional  
>> DVDs and
>> Interactive Maps
>> http://www.contrafusion.co.uk for Contra Dancing in Kent
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Callers mailing list
>> Callers at sharedweight.net
>> http://www.sharedweight.net/mailman/listinfo/callers
>  		 	   		
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 2010 12:58:42 -0500
> From: Lisa Greenleaf <laleaf at verizon.net>
> To: Caller's discussion list <callers at sharedweight.net>
> Subject: Re: [Callers] ricochet or push-back hey - Tapsalteerie
> Message-ID: <9B6B880F-78F1-42C9-A29B-F4CBB2E9FC71 at verizon.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>>  Adam Carlson's Queen Bee
>
>
> A little history here:  Adam was the first to take this dance  
> flourish and put it in a dance.  He called it the figure a Queen  
> Bee hey after a neighborhood in Seattle.  I liked the move but  
> wanted a name that reflected the action of the figure, so I called  
> it a ricochet hey  and wrote a dance with the same name; the dance  
> is a riff on Tony Parkes' Flirtation Reel.
>
> My original dance had alternating 1s and 2s, but that worked only  
> with experienced or up-for-anything crowds.  I don't call this any  
> more, as other folks have written much better dances!
>
> Ricochet Hey	Duple Improper
>
> A1 (8) Down 4 in line , 1s in middle, turn alone	(8) Up, face N (1s  
> BTB in middle)	
> A2 (16) Passing Neighbor R,  1s whole hey, 2s Ricochet		
> B1 (16) B&S N		
> B2 (8) For & Back	 (8) 1s Sw, face down		
>
> 	
> Lisa Greenleaf
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 15:32:52 -0600
> From: Martha Edwards <meedwards at westendweb.com>
> To: "Caller's discussion list" <callers at sharedweight.net>
> Subject: Re: [Callers] Teaching a Ricochet Hey
> Message-ID:
> 	<AANLkTikPqPe2xhMfu3fuLO2ckOyeERGBpnSi71ThgRpm at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> I find that if it's a regular hey (ladies start by the right  
> shoulder) a
> ricochet hey feels a bit like a reverse Mad Robin - walking a sort  
> of dosido
> track while facing across - adding, of course, the push-off...
>
> M
> E
>
> On Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 11:43 AM, John Sweeney  
> <info at contrafusion.co.uk>wrote:
>
>> The key thing for the caller to understand is that when the two  
>> dancers
>> ricochet they take each other's place in the hey, and are now going
>> backwards.
>>
>> This means that they must NOT just bounce back the way they came,  
>> or to
>> a neutral position on their own side - they have to follow the  
>> looping
>> flow of the hey.
>>
>> I never actually explain that though.  I just tell them to bounce  
>> back
>> at the opposite angle to the way they came in.  Describing it as a
>> triangle usually helps. And one quick demo usually solves 90% of the
>> problems.
>>
>> The other 10% of the problems come from people who bounce back and  
>> then
>> stop!  They are still part of the hey and have to keep moving.
>>
>> So instructions like these sometimes work: "As you come to the middle
>> you will meet someone on a diagonal; bounce off that person and head
>> backwards on the other diagonal, then move left* and come in  
>> again; you
>> are going around the same triangle over and over again."
>>
>> *or right, depends on the dance.
>>
>> Note: As you bounce you change direction by just under 90 degrees,  
>> it is
>> very easy to let that rotation continue and throw a couple of  
>> spins in
>> :-)
>>
>>            Happy dancing,
>>                        John
>>
>> John Sweeney, Dancer, England   john at modernjive.com 01233 625 362 &
>> 07802 940 574
>> http://www.modernjive.com for Modern Jive Events, Instructional  
>> DVDs and
>> Interactive Maps
>> http://www.contrafusion.co.uk for Contra Dancing in Kent
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Callers mailing list
>> Callers at sharedweight.net
>> http://www.sharedweight.net/mailman/listinfo/callers
>>
>
>
>
> -- 
> For the good are always the merry,
> Save by an evil chance,
> And the merry love the fiddle
> And the merry love to dance. ~ William Butler Yeats
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 07 Dec 2010 18:09:34 -0500
> From: Andrea Nettleton <twirly-girl at bellsouth.net>
> To: callers at sharedweight.net
> Subject: Re: [Callers] Teaching a Ricochet Hey
> Message-ID: <4CFEBEAE.4050903 at bellsouth.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> I teach a ricochet hey like a slice of pizza.  You go in up the  
> side of
> the slice, angle back out down the other side of the slice, and curve
> back to place along the crust.  The other dancers dance the crust  
> first
> then either cross, or in a double ricochet hey, go into the center and
> back out along the sides of the slice of pizza. Worked when I  
> taught my
> dance, Mambo, to my skit cast for West Side Contra.  I wrote a move
> which I believe is novel, which I called a Half Ricochet Allemande  
> Hey.
> It actually returns all participants to their original places,  
> which are
> already progressed, but gets them moving in the right direction.   
> In it,
> the ladies travel the pizza slice as described above, but the  
> gents, who
> are across the set from their partners, travel the crust first, and
> instead of passing by the right to cross over, continue the circle  
> they
> began by allemande-ing back to place and on to meet their new  
> neighbor.
> It has a beautiful  flow, the circle folding in on itself like waves
> tumbling over one another in the ocean.  Here is the dance, not as we
> danced it in the skit, which we had to do shifted forward a half  
> phrase
> to accommodate the hits in the music, but as you would teach it to a
> hall of dancers, but probably not one full of newbies.  :-)
>
> MAMBO!   (Improper)
>
> A1 Partners face and Mad Robin
>
>       Circle L 1x
>
> A2 Balance the ring, Spin R 1 place (Petronella)
>
>       Partner Swing
>
> B1 R & L Through
>
>       Ladies Chain
>
> B2 1/2 Ricochet Allemande Hey [OR California Roll] *See below
>
>       New Nbr. Gypsy
>
> *In a 1/2 Ricochet Allemande Hey, the Ladies, who are coming out of  
> the
> Courtesy Turn following the Ladies Chain, go into the center, ricochet
> (push one another back and to the left.)  They arrive at their Nbr's
> place turn and curve out and towards their starting place, then beyond
> for the gypsy.  The Gents curve back and to the right then into the
> center for an Allemande L (some would call it a 1/2, some 3/4, I say
> till they are back where they began the 'Hey'), and continue past the
> starting place to Gypsy a New Nbr. to Gypsy.  It isn't exactly a Hey,
> though that's where I started with the move.  It does have a nice
> folding quality to it and spits everyone out moving toward the New  
> Nbr.
> I think of the Ladies as doing a slice of pizza, making the tasty  
> point
> first, ending with the crust, while the Gents do a whole pie, starting
> with the same bit of crust the Ladies will later do.  Tasty for all.
>
> To do the California Roll in this dance: when the Ladies come out of
> said Courtesy Turn, all free up their hands and face into their  
> original
> hands four as they would if they circled,  with Partners standing  
> across
> the set.  Partners take the handy hand, which is the Lady's R, the
> Gent's L, lift joined hands, the lady curls in toward her partner and
> walks under while he walks past, to swap, reverse direction, and face
> New Nbrs.  Not yet proper, they immediately do a Roll Away with a Half
> Sashay to swap places but continue to face the New Neighbors, whom  
> they
> might then Gypsy.  I used the move to end the dance.  It gives very
> elastic and satisfying connection with the partner for such a purpose,
> but could also function as a perfectly good progression.  It is less
> good in that capacity for this dance because the first New Nbr.
> interaction is a forward moving one.  It might be more properly  
> termed a
> Nevada Roll due to the starting positions, but who can resist  
> something
> as funny and catchy as a California Roll?
>
>
>
> On 12/7/2010 4:32 PM, Martha Edwards wrote:
>> I find that if it's a regular hey (ladies start by the right  
>> shoulder) a
>> ricochet hey feels a bit like a reverse Mad Robin - walking a sort  
>> of dosido
>> track while facing across - adding, of course, the push-off...
>>
>> M
>> E
>>
>> On Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 11:43 AM, John  
>> Sweeney<info at contrafusion.co.uk>wrote:
>>
>>> The key thing for the caller to understand is that when the two  
>>> dancers
>>> ricochet they take each other's place in the hey, and are now going
>>> backwards.
>>>
>>> This means that they must NOT just bounce back the way they came,  
>>> or to
>>> a neutral position on their own side - they have to follow the  
>>> looping
>>> flow of the hey.
>>>
>>> I never actually explain that though.  I just tell them to bounce  
>>> back
>>> at the opposite angle to the way they came in.  Describing it as a
>>> triangle usually helps. And one quick demo usually solves 90% of the
>>> problems.
>>>
>>> The other 10% of the problems come from people who bounce back  
>>> and then
>>> stop!  They are still part of the hey and have to keep moving.
>>>
>>> So instructions like these sometimes work: "As you come to the  
>>> middle
>>> you will meet someone on a diagonal; bounce off that person and head
>>> backwards on the other diagonal, then move left* and come in  
>>> again; you
>>> are going around the same triangle over and over again."
>>>
>>> *or right, depends on the dance.
>>>
>>> Note: As you bounce you change direction by just under 90  
>>> degrees, it is
>>> very easy to let that rotation continue and throw a couple of  
>>> spins in
>>> :-)
>>>
>>>             Happy dancing,
>>>                         John
>>>
>>> John Sweeney, Dancer, England   john at modernjive.com 01233 625 362&
>>> 07802 940 574
>>> http://www.modernjive.com for Modern Jive Events, Instructional  
>>> DVDs and
>>> Interactive Maps
>>> http://www.contrafusion.co.uk for Contra Dancing in Kent
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Callers mailing list
>>> Callers at sharedweight.net
>>> http://www.sharedweight.net/mailman/listinfo/callers
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 14:49:23 -0000
> From: "John Sweeney" <info at contrafusion.co.uk>
> To: <callers at sharedweight.net>
> Subject: Re: [Callers] Ricochet Hey
> Message-ID: <58F0164537EA4103B3909D045E0477C1 at JohnT400>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> The ones I know are:
>
> Ricochet Hey #1 (no idea who wrote it, sorry)
> Contra; Improper
>
> Start in lines of four facing down, #1s in the middle
> A1:	Down the Hall in Lines of Four; Turn Alone
> 	Up the Hall in Lines of Four; #1s face #2s
> A2:	Full Hey: normal Hey for #1s; Ricochet Hey for #2s
> B1:	Neighbour Balance & Swing
> B2:	Long Lines Forward & Back
> 	#1s Swing - end facing down to pick up next #2s
>
>
> Rolling Hey (by Charley Harvey)
> Contra; Improper
>
> A1:	Circle Left; Neighbor Swing
> A2:	Circle Left 3/4; Partner Swing
> B1:	Star Right; Ladies' Chain
> B2:	Ricochet Hey for all - start with Ladies into the centre on a
> slight Right diagonal; push back on a slight Left diagonal, then  
> step to
> the right; Men do the same, starting with the step to the right;  
> REPEAT)
> - so no-one ever crosses the set during the Hey.
> 	Ladies keep moving to the right into a new circle.  Men turn to
> their left out of the last push into a new circle.
>
>             Happy dancing,
>
>                         John
> John Sweeney, Dancer, England   john at modernjive.com 01233 625 362 &
> 07802 940 574
> http://www.contrafusion.co.uk for Contra Dancing in Kent
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Callers mailing list
> Callers at sharedweight.net
> http://www.sharedweight.net/mailman/listinfo/callers
>
>
> End of Callers Digest, Vol 76, Issue 13
> ***************************************




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